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Archive for the ‘Goal-setting’ Category

“The future belongs to the common man with uncommon determination.”

Baba Amte

When I was in junior high school, I joined the local Junior Achievement chapter. My “company” made Christmas tree skirts which we later sold to our parents.

The lesson I learned from this:

cheap material + even cheaper labor + parental connections = profit

Find your unique gift; create a product or service that fills a need, than sell it to your network. How did I get that from felt skirts? Our product weren’t poorly constructed Christmas accessory; they were handcrafted symbols of ourselves that our target audience would pay a premium for.

What is your product?

What makes it (or you) unique?

Who is your audience?

Why do they want your product?

Who is your competitor?

What are they doing better (or worse) than you?

What is your cost of sale? In other words, what does each sale (income) cost you to produce (expense)

How will you market your product to your audience?

What will that cost?

Where do you want to be, in terms of production, in 1 year-2 years-5 years?

What will it take to accomplish this?

Your business plan should answer all of these questions, and more. Some people (e.g. me) prefer a deep strategic plan over a conventional business plan. In a strategic plan, you create your company culture as you create your plan for success.

A strategic plan typically includes a company’s mission, vision and value statements, and an expectation about how you’ll conduct business. If you plan to have partners, this step is vital

Successful people:

are passionate.

Your passion is the reason you get up in the morning, work late at night or borrow money from your family to finance start-up costs.  Without passion, you’ll quit at the first sign of trouble or when a better offer comes along. Are you following your passion?

solve problems.

If you can solve other people’s problems, they’ll throw money at you. Easy, right?

Find a job no one else wants and do it. Find the knowledge few know and learn it.

To sell yourself and your product or service, define what value you bring to the table.

Are you faster?

Cheaper?

Better?

Any 2 of the 3 will do.  If you’re faster than your competition, you don’t have to be cheaper, but your quality has to be at least as good as theirs.  Your customer will pay a premium for speed, but won’t accept inferiority at any price.

produce.

Do you have a business plan (see above)? Are you working it every day?  Do you account for your results?

Does your plan focus on the problem you’re solving for the customer and/or the unique value that you’re adding to the transaction?

Who are your customers? How do they find you?

Every sale results from you talking to your customers or would-be customers.  Talk to them everyday.

Don’t waste time with mediocre people, thoughts or actions. Just take daily steps toward your goal

By the way, I still have the Christmas tree skirt. Now an antique family heirloom, it’s value has no doubt increased accordingly.

If you’re ready to stop treating yourself like an employee, and instead develop the skills and leadership of a CEO, signup for the online version of The Business of your Business: Formula, Financials, Function and Freedom.

This article originally ran in the Las Chapter of the Women’s Council of REALTORS newsletter.

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Where are you going?

“If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there.” Lewis Carroll

Imagine you’re sitting in an airplane. The captain gets on the intercom and says: “Folks, we’re 2nd in line for takeoff. Where would you like to go?”

If your perfect life is the destination, don’t you want to get there as quickly, easily and cheaply as possible? Maybe you can do so without creating a business plan, but I can’t imagine how.  A plan will help you make better and faster decisions, decide how you spend your money or time and track your progress.

Start now.

scott-as-patton

“A good plan executed today is better than a perfect plan executed next week.” General George S. Patton

Complete your annual plan by November so that you can relax and sit on your plan for a month or so before executing it.  Review (and revise if needed) your progress quarterly.  This is not a New Year’s resolution to be enacted in January and discarded by February.  This is an action plan that will get you to your biggest life goals.

It’s time to focus your energy onto your goals and dreams. Find a place with trees and fresh air where you can concentrate on your future.

There are myriad ways to create your plan and they all start with a vision.

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“I love it when a plan comes together.” Hannibal Smith-The A-Team

What do you want to do, be or have in 2-5 years?

What motivates you to jump out of bed in the morning, or work late into the night?

Your vision must be:

Specific- What will it look like once you’ve reached your goal? Where will you live? What will you do each day? Who will your friends, neighbors or co-workers be?

Vivid- Realism is the key to visualization so use all of your senses when describing your goal.  The goal is to make your mind believe your future outcome is happening now.  With consistent visualization, your mind accepts the image of success and suddenly you’re seeing inspiration and opportunity everywhere.

Compelling-How will your life (or the lives of your family members) improve once you’ve achieved your goal?

Desirable-Is this your dream or only something you think you should want?  The more you want the outcome, the more likely it is you’ll achieve it. If your goal isn’t compelling, you’ll quit at the first sign of trouble.

Realistic-Do you have enough time, energy and support to reach your goal? Have others done it before? If it’s been done, there’s a proven strategy to do it, you just have to find it.

Focused- Instead of creating a to-do list, concentrate your energy on accomplishing up to 3 bigger goals.

Flexible-There are lots of ways to get to your outcome.  If your goal is to provide your son with an Ivy League education instead of concentrating on just one way to get there (saving lots of money), brainstorm all the ways you could make it happen (scholarships, part-time work, etc.)

Easy to communicate- Can you describe your end result concisely in terms anyone can understand?

Close your eyes and imagine your future.

Having trouble visualizing?

Look for someone who’s already achieved your goal.  What does that person’s life look like?  Draw, paint a picture, or write a story as if you’re reporting on your future self.  Then distill that scene, picture or story into your vision statement.

Once you’ve articulated your vision, make it real.

Step 1:  Writing your goal down makes it tangible and on those days when you’re frustrated or unfocused, you can look at what you’ve written and get back on track.

The more accountable you are, the more likely it is you’ll achieve your goal. Find an accountability partner who’s committed to her own goals. Better yet, find someone who already attained your goal.  Tell that person your goals and ask for help in keeping your commitments.

Step 2: Determine what it will take to get there. What skills, knowledge and resources will you need?

If you want to live in France, you’ll need to learn French (skill), find a place to live (knowledge) and save money (resources.)

Step 3: Break each task down into short-term goals you can accomplish in 1,2 or 3 months.

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“Set your goals high and don't stop until you get there” Bo Jackson

Write down your top 5 values in order. If your goal conflicts with your values, you’ll never achieve it.

If you’re not sure what constitutes a value, this list can help. When you commit to your values and have written goals, choosing between competing demands gets easier. As does making decisions.

Sally’s top value is family, followed by financial independence.  A single mother with 2 kids, she’s been offered a job that doubles her salary but requires her to leave town every weekend. She has to either decline the job, or rerank her values.

Acknowledging your values, prioritize your short-term goals.  Your goals should have a deadline as well as a tangible, measurable end-result.  Set goals that are tough but realistic to achieve.

In On Writing, Stephen King compares writing to telepathy. Even though he writes every novel, short story, and magazine article in a certain place and at a certain time, you can be miles and decades away and still receive his communication clearly.

If writing is telepathy, planning and envisioning are clairvoyance. Planning your tomorrow today will bring your vision of the future to fruition.

What to learn more?

Join me on Wednesday, November 3rd at The New Orleans Marriott.

Get details and register here.

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What are the questions that keep you awake in the middle of the night?

How will I pay my bills?

Why can’t I get my deals to close?

How do I sell houses to buyers who are afraid of losing their jobs?

Listen to the call

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Dreaming

funny-pictures-dreams-have-flavor

“We plan our lives according to a dream that came to us in our childhood, and we find that life alters our plans. And yet, at the end, from a rare height, we also see that our dream was our fate. It’s just that providence had other ideas as to how we would get there. Destiny plans a different route, or turns the dream around, as if it were a riddle, and fulfills the dream in ways we couldn’t have expected.”

Ben Okri

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But for now I’m taking the lazy route and pointing you to my new post at TheKincaidTeam.com.

Who are you?

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I was 20 years old when I started my real estate career. The year was 1980; John Lennon was killed, Ronald Reagan elected president and interest rates were at 18%.

In retrospect, it was not the best time to get into real estate but what did I know? I was just a kid. It was easy to take risks because I didn’t have a lot of experience with failure.

Everything I am today is the result of trial and error. Along the way, I have had some wonderful teachers, role models and mentors. Any mistakes I have made are mine and should not reflect on these great minds.

Although it was difficult, I wouldn’t have had it any other way. Those experiences made me who I am today.

But, what if I knew then what I know now?

This weekend, Jessy & I created the business plan for our new venture, a real estate sales, investment & development company-Kincaid Enterprises.
(The name needs help. We’re working on that. Any suggestions would be appreciated.)

The combination of my experience in creating and running a company and her enthusiasm and excitement at a new opportunity make us a dynamic team. I am looking forward to showing her the ropes and learning some new tricks as well.

Watch your mail, e-mail, and this space for information on how you can be a part of our success.

And remember, if you or your clients are looking to buy, sell or invest in the Southern Nevada market, we would love to be of service.

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